Bird Watching

Nature & Geology

Nature

During your Australian outback holiday at Kings Canyon you have the opportunity to experience truly unique nature.

Watarrka National Park protects one of Australia’s most stunning natural environments. The George Gill Range rises out of the desert like the walls of a once-strong fortress.

Time has carved great buttresses out of its swooping sandstone sides. The surfaces are punctured with rocky crags having battled the elements for more than 300 million years. Ancient marine fossils etched into the rock show the incredible environmental changes that have taken place over time.

You can also get a glimpse of the environment that once was when you enter Australia’s own "Garden of Eden". This inexplicably lush garden of feathery cycad ferns can be found deep in the gorge of the canyon.

Kings Canyon is truly an environmental wonderland, its history evident at every step. During your holiday in the Red Centre, with icons such as Uluru (Ayers Rock) and Kata Tjuta, we suggest you drive and experience the real outback of Australia.


Geology

When we speak of geological time we talk in terms of millions of years. If you drive along the Mereenie Loop Road from Alice Springs, you will encounter the 800-million-year-old MacDonnell Ranges, passing the ancient Finke River, Mount Sonder and the incredible Haasts Bluff. Slightly "younger" than its southern cousins, Uluru (Ayers Rock) and KataTjuta (the Olgas), which were formed some 550 million years ago, the sandstone of Kings Canyon was laid 440 million years ago at about the same time the first life on land appeared.

When you think that the earth was formed 4,600 million years ago and that the dinosaurs became extinct just 65 million years ago, you can appreciate how ancient the Central Australian landscape is and what monumental forces have shaped and moulded what you see today.
When we speak of geological time we talk in terms of millions of years. If you drive along the Mereenie Loop Road from Alice Springs, you will encounter the 800-million-year-old MacDonnell Ranges, passing the ancient Finke River, Mount Sonder and the incredible Haasts Bluff. Slightly "younger" than its southern cousins, Uluru (Ayers Rock) and KataTjuta (the Olgas), which were formed some 550 million years ago, the sandstone of Kings Canyon was laid 440 million years ago at about the same time the first life on land appeared.

When you think that the earth was formed 4,600 million years ago and that the dinosaurs became extinct just 65 million years ago, you can appreciate how ancient the Central Australian landscape is and what monumental forces have shaped and moulded what you see today.